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Paidong Industrial Zone Qiligang,Yueqing City,Zhejiang province,China.
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    04 Jul, 2022
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    Type B RCD for EV Charging Systems and UPS

    Do you have any idea about residual current devices? Do you know what residual current device is used for the universal power supply? Do you have any idea about what happens inside your safety switches? Are you looking for a residual current device best for your electric vehicle charging system? If you have no idea about the answers to these questions, no worries at all. This blog post will tell you all about Type B residual current devices used for both purposes (charging of your electric vehicles and universal power supply. We will also share necessary information about different types of residual current devices. Keep reading for more information.

    What is a Residual Current Device?

    Residual current devices protect your safety switches. They provide protection in three ways, i.e., fire protection, fault protection, and additional protection.

    1. Fire protection for currents of higher mA, usually more than 300 mA
    2. Fault protection for tripping currents
    3. Additional protection for currents with lower mA less than 30 mA

    Composition and Working of Residual Current Devices

    Residual current devices are designed with coils of wires around a cord. A Residual Current Device monitors the earth leakage and acts as a safety guard.

    A residual current device is based on two different technologies. One is electromagnetic, and the other is electronic. Both technologies offer great performance. Electromagnetic devices are strong enough to detect very small residual currents and require no earth lead. There has no impact on them due to the temporary loss of the electric power supply. On the other hand, electronic devices are comparatively less strong, so they require earth lead to perform well during the loss of the electric power supply.

    Types of Residual Current Devices

    There are different kinds of residual current devices that work for the protection of switches, devices, and people in the surroundings.

    Let’s discuss these types of residual current devices.

    • RCCB – Residual current circuit breaker breaks the circuit and stops the flow of the current during an event of earth leakage. They do not give any response to the short circuits or over currents. To handle issues related to short circuits and over currents, you need an additional breaker to provide maximum protection and safety to your switches and circuits.
    • RCBO – Residual current operated circuit breaker has additional features. It does not need an additional breaker to deal with the short circuits, overload, and over currents.
    • SRCB – Socket outlet residual current devices are usually used for fixed installations. The switching contact in your main circuit board opens the value for the residual currents. Switched socket outlet is available in both single and twin versions with white plastic material.
    • FCURCD – Fused connection units incorporated within the residual current devices are used for fixed installations like socket outlets. These devices incorporate a sensing circuit that automatically generates the contact between switches of the main circuit board, which will open the value of the residual currents.
    • RCM – Residual current monitor is the device that monitors the electrical installations or electric circuits to inspect the presence of unbalanced earth fault currents. The residual current monitors do not incorporate the tripping devices and over current protection.
    • MRCD – Modular residual current device is an independent device to incorporate protection to the residual currents. They do not incorporate overcurrent protection. These devices can signal the associated switches and devices to trip immediately during an abnormal event.
    • PRCD – Portable residual current device consists of a plug, one or more socket outlets, and a residual current device. These devices typically protect the appliances, circuits, and people during an event of over current or overload.

    There are other types, usually called wave form types of residual current devices. These forms are:

    1. Type A
    2. Type AC
    3. Type F
    4. Type B

    These types are briefly described below:

    Type A Residual Current Devices

    Type A residual current devices are best for AC and DC power. Appliances that work better with type A residual current devices are inverters, induction hobs, charging equipment for electric vehicles, power supplies, IT equipment, and lighting equipment such as dimmers and LED drivers. These devices are also good for appliances with type AC.

    Type AC Residual Current Devices

    Type AC residual current devices protect the resistive and inductive electrical equipment. Appliances for type AC residual current devices are hob, oven, heater, electric showers, and tungsten lighting.

    Type F Residual Current Devices

    Type F residual current devices are designed to protect residual fault currents more. They safe compensations produced due to compound incidences. Type F residual current devices are typically used for appliances that control frequency. Type F residual current devices can be used for appliances such as air conditioners, power tools, dishwashers, tumble driers, and washing machines. These devices are also suitable for Type AC and Type A appliances.

    Type B Residual Current Devices

    If you are an electrician working with the electrical wires to set up the EV charger at home, you might have heard about the Type B RCD. This is similar to the Type B RCCB.

    Let’s discuss the Type B residual current devices in detail.

    Type-b-RCD Symbol Description

    Composition of Type B Residual Current Devices

    Type B residual current devices are designed to combine two different residual current devices. The first system uses technology to detect smooth current. The second system uses a technology that depends on the voltage. This is designed by keeping in mind that it should work even if there is no line voltage.

    What Type B Residual Current Devices Do?

    Type B residual current device disconnects the power if the earth leakage current is detected as dangerous. If the earth leakage current is equal to or less than ten mA, then the Type B residual current devices would not trip because this current amount is not dangerous. The electric car will continue to get charging without any interruption. The Type B residual current devices will immediately trip the circuit and disconnect the power supply for higher currents. Like this, Type B residual current devices will protect the circuits from danger.

    You can always not minimize the risks of shocks produced by contact with conductors. The ratio of accidents increases with every passing day due to electric shocks. New residual current devices are designed to protect and save surrounding people and property from danger to minimize these risks.

    Cost of Type B Residual Current Devices

    Type B residual current devices are a bit expensive compared to the other ones. These are expensive, but they provide a reliable solution for the users and homeowners with less tripping. With Type B residual current devices, homeowners and users are fully satisfied as they have fewer tripping chances, so their cars will be charged fully when they wake up in the morning.

    Benefits of Type B Residual Current Devices

    There are a lot of advantages of using Type B residual current devices.

    • One of the major benefits mentioned above is that it has fewer chances of tripping by providing better reliable customer solutions.
    • Other than that, Type B residual current devices will ensure the services’ continuity.
    • Another benefit is that Type B residual current devices will detect the earth leakages at greater frequencies and protect the circuits and appliances from risks and electric shocks.
    • Last but not least, Type B RCCB protects persons and machines when a DC with a high-frequency AC fault current exists.

    Difference between Type A, Type B, and Type C RCD

    Type A enables the tripping for residual AC and pulsating DC currents, while type B also ensures the tripping for smooth DC currents other than residual AC and pulsating DC currents.

    Applications for Type B Residual Current Devices

    Type B residual current devices are best for three phase appliances like EV charges. These three phase drivers can cause earth leakages at different frequencies. EV manufacturers used to say that there is a built-in detection device within the EV chargers that detect the leakage and provide protection. But Type B residual current devices will ensure the continuity of the supply to charge the electric vehicle smoothly.

    Type B residual current devices are also recommended for PV systems. It helps to protect the electrocution by using DC or AC converters. Type B residual current devices can also be used for electro-medical instruments, ventilation systems, inverters, universal power supplies UPS, EV vehicle charging stations, lifts, escalators, welding equipment, welding machines, industrial machines, elevators, photo voltaic systems, and crane powered from a mobile panel board. Type B residual current devices are also suitable for Type AC, Type F, and Type A applications.

    Type EV Residual Current Devices

    Type EV residual current devices are specifically for EV charging systems and stations. These devices can detect AC and DC residual currents. This is a lower-cost option for the Type B residual current devices. Type EV residual current devices have different features.

    • It operates from a phase to phase or a single phase supply.
    • It is used for two or three phase loads in compliance with international electric vehicle charging systems standards.
    • There is a built in test button to test the devices.

    RCD Basic Requirements for EV Charging Systems

    You may be wondering how an EV charger works. It is so simple. An EV charger pulls an electrical current from an outlet or a grid. It then transfers the electricity to the vehicle through the attached wire. The method is similar to EV charging, just like you charge other appliances at your home by plugging the charger into the wall.

    The converters are built in the car, which is called the onboard charger. The converter in the electric vehicle converts the power from AC to DC. Later, it feeds and supplies the power and electricity to the electric vehicle’s battery. This is the most common method to charge your electric vehicles.

    Charging of Electric Vehicles with EV or DC Chargers

    Charging an electric vehicle depends on the car’s battery’s size and the dispenser’s output. Other factors also affect the charging time and speed. Most electric vehicles can get 80% charging within an hour using available fast DC chargers. These chargers are essential for those who want to cover high mileage, long distances, and large fleets. Remember that DC chargers are much faster than AC chargers, which is why a DC charger is expensive to install compared to an AC charger. If you look for the long term benefits of these chargers, you will never think about the expensive installation of these fast DC chargers for your electric vehicles.

    How to Buy Type B Residual Current Devices?

    When you are buying a type B residual current device, you must ensure the reliability of the devices. The safety and life of your switches depend on the residual current devices. Prefer to buy a device that is good in ratings and reviews. There are a lot of brands available in the market. Look for someone who is trustworthy, reliable, and has a good reputation. Electricity is a basic need these days, so never compromise on the related matters and issues.

    Final Words

    So, this is all about Type B residual current devices or Type B RCCB. Remember that Type B RCCB provides the maximum level of protection among several types of residual current devices. For more information about Type B RCCB, you may read a IEC standard related to  IEC / EN 62423 Type B Residual Current Circuit Breakers.

    If you like this blog, you can mention it in the comments below. If you have any queries regarding residual current devices, types, and implications, feel free to ask anytime.

    For more information and related articles, please keep visiting our website. Cheers! Happy sharing!

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